Sunday, November 18, 2012

mosaics

in the Valencia train station

waiting room above     ticket counter area below

17 comments:

toby said...

My goodness, that is by far the classiest train station I have ever seen! Thanks so much for sharing these with us!

Andy said...

I agree with Toby. This train station is one of a kind.

Chrissy Brand said...

So lovely- what a well kept station.

Ralph said...

The tile mosaics are amazing - the daily commuters are in such a hurry these days, they hurry to and from the train without looking at the art all around them. So many people purchase e-tickets that they pass by the beautiful woodwork that surrounds the ticket windows. Too bad, the utilitarian looks great here but is mostly ignored...

Patti said...

I cannot believe that is a train station. The mosaics are beautiful.

ArtandArchitecture-SF.com said...

Absolutely breathtaking!

Irene said...

Train stations can hide the nicest architectural details. I always find them an inspiration.

lgsquirrel said...

Beautiful.

Oakland Daily Photo said...

What an incredibly elegant interior. The mosaics are beautiful. This makes me want to go to Valencia just to see them for myself. Thanks for bringing them to us and for contributing to Monday Mural.

RedPat said...

So lovely!

Lesley said...

You know I have never been on a train...
Perhaps I should take a visit to Spain. This is stunning.

Robert Geiss said...

Timeless.

Would probably let one or two trains pass to continue looking.

Please have a good Tuesday.

daily athens photo

Sara said...

Truly stunning!

sparrow said...

stunning! I wonder if the tiles were that clean when there were only steam engines!

Halcyon said...

Gorgeous! Why don't they make places like this anymore?

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

That's beautiful! Incredibly so for a train station. wow.

Mark R said...

As you say, there is a beauty that surrounds us, and often we don't 'see' it - such as this, I'm sure.
I've often been happy to be classified as a 'tourist' - one who stops and stares, I think - because its opposite, a 'traveller', gets into the minutiae of living in a place and can sometimes miss these extraodinary, and ordinary!, sights.

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